Alfred Schnittke

Alfred Garyevich Schnittke (Russian: Альфред Гарриевич Шнитке)

Also known as A. Schnittke, A. Šnitke, A.Schnittke, Alfred Šnitke, B1 to D1, А. Шнитке, А. Шнитке / A. Schnittke, Альфред Шнитке, Шнитке, Schnittke
This performer (group) in the Internet: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Schnittke, http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_Schnittke

Discography of Alfred Schnittke:

# Release title Total tracks Type of release is Imprint date Label
1 Classikon 100: Musik Des 20. Jahrhunderts II 22 Audio 1994
2 Music For The Movies 29 Audio 2001 cpo
3 The Complete String Quartets 23 Audio 1998 Nonesuch
4 Concerto For Piano - Variations On One Chord - Improvisation & Fugue 3 Audio 2008 Fuga Libera
5 Cello Concerto / Stille Musik / Cello Sonata 11 Audio 1998 Naxos
6 Choir Concerto / Requiem 20 Audio 2008 Praga Digitals
7 Symphony No. 6 · Symphony No. 7 9 Audio 1996-02-00 BIS
8 Concerto Grosso No. 1 - Quasi Una Sonata - Moz-Art À La Haydn - A Paganini 11 Audio 1990 Deutsche Grammophon
9 Symphony No. 2 7 Audio 1990 Мелодия
10 Hymns / Chamber Symphony 9 Audio 1990 Мелодия
11 Concerto Grosso No.2 (1981-1982) / Concerto For Viola And Orchestra (1985) 9 Audio 1990 Мелодия
12 Concerto Grosso No. 1 / Concerto For Cello And Orchestra 2 Audio 1990 Мелодия
13 Lento 2 Audio 2003
14 Vom Winde Beweint / Konzert Für Viola Und Orchester 2 Audio 1992
15 Dolorosa 3 Audio 1997
16 Symphony No. 9 / Nunc Dimittis 2 Audio 2009
17 The Ten Symphonies 58 Audio 2009-11-00 BIS
18 Der Neunte Tag - The Ninth Day 12 Audio 2004 BIS
19 Cello Concerto / Stille Musik / Cello Sonata 11 Audio 1990 Marco Polo
20 Piano Concerto Etc 10 Audio 1997 Ondine
21 Quasi Una Sonata 13 Audio 1997 Sonora Productions
22 In Memoriam / Viola Concerto 10 Audio 1989 BIS
23 Concerto For Piano Four Hands/Concerto For Piano And Strings 2 Audio 2003 Apex
24 Piano Quintet/String Quartet N. 3/Canon In Memoriam Igor Stravinsky 11 Audio 1991 Etcetera (3)
25 Quasi Una Sonata - Piano Trio - Piano Sonata No.2 8 Audio 1993 Sony Classical
26 4. Concerto Grosso - 5. Sinfonie; Pianissimo 8 Audio 1988-01-00 BIS
27 Concerto Grosso I · Concerto For Oboe And Harp · Concerto For Piano And Strings 10 Audio 1987-01-00 BIS
28 Symphony No. 2, "St. Florian" 9 Audio 1995-01-00 BIS
29 Symphony No. 3 5 Audio 1990-02-00 BIS
30 Symphony No. 4; Requiem 16 Audio 1990-10-00 BIS
31 Symphony No. 0; Nagasaki 11 Audio 2007-04-00 BIS
32 Symphonic Prelude / Symphony No. 8 / For Liverpool 9 Audio 2005-02-00 BIS
33 Piano Quintet; Kanon In Memoriam Igor Stravinsky; Piano Quartet; String Trio 12 Audio 1992-04-00 BIS
34 Symphony No. 8; Concerto Grosso No. 6 10 Audio 1995 Chandos
35 Symphony No. 2 "St. Florian" 7 Audio 1997 Chandos
36 Symphony No. 7 / Cello Concerto No. 1 9 Audio 2000-06-00 Chandos
37 Symphony No. 8 / Suite From "The Census List" 15 Audio 2001-04-00 Chandos
38 String Quartets Nos. 2 & 3; Piano Quintet 15 Audio 1998 Arabesque Recordings
39 Cello Concerto No. 2 - In Memoriam... 12 Audio 1992 Sony Classical
40 Piano Quintets 11 Audio 1994 Russian Disc
41 Requiem / Piano Concerto 16 Audio 1997 Chandos
42 Psalms Of Repentance 4 Audio 1999
43 Film Music 32 Audio 1994 Olympia (2)
44 String Quartets 10 Audio 1993 EMI Classics
45 Concerto Grosso Nr. 1 U.A. 10 Audio 1990 Deutsche Grammophon
46 Requiem 23 Audio 2001-04-24 Classico
47 2. Streichquartett / Quartett Für 2 Violinen 10 Audio Preciosa AULOS
48 Violin Concerto / Concerto Grosso No. 5 9 Audio 2010 Deutsche Grammophon
49 Violinkonzert • Violin Concerto (Cadenza: Schnittke) 4 Audio 1990
50 Orchestral Works & Chamber Music 6 Audio 2000


Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998) was born on 24 November 1934 in Engels, on the Volga River, in the Soviet Union. His father was born in Frankfurt to a Jewish family of Russian origin who had moved to the USSR in 1926, and his mother was a Volga-German born in Russia. Schnittke began his musical education in 1946 in Vienna where his father, a journalist and translator, had been posted. In 1948 the family moved to Moscow, where Schnittke studied piano and received a diploma in choral conducting. From 1953 to 1958 he studied counterpoint and composition with Yevgeny Golubev and instrumentation with Nikolai Rakov at the Moscow Conservatory. Schnittke completed the postgraduate course in composition there in 1961 and joined the Union of Composers the same year. He was particularly encouraged by Phillip Herschkowitz, a Webern disciple, who resided in the Soviet capital. In 1962, Schnittke was appointed instructor in instrumentation at the Moscow Conservatory, a post which he held until 1972. Thereafter he supported himself chiefly as a composer of film scores; by 1984 he had scored more than 60 films. Noted, above all, for his hallmark "polystylistic" idiom, Schnittke has written in a wide range of genres and styles. His “Concerto Grosso No. 1” (1977) was one of the first works to bring his name to prominence. It was popularized by Gidon Kremer, a tireless proponent of his music. Many of Schnittke's works have been inspired by Kremer and other prominent performers, including Yury Bashmet, Natalia Gutman, Gennady Rozhdestvensky and Mstislav Rostropovich. Schnittke first came to America in 1988 for the "Making Music Together" Festival in Boston and the American premiere of “Symphony No. 1” by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. He came again in 1991 when Carnegie Hall commissioned “Concerto Grosso No. 5” for the Cleveland Orchestra as part of its Centennial Festival, and again in 1994 for the world premiere of his “Symphony No. 7” by the New York Philharmonic and the American premiere of his “Symphony No. 6” by the National Symphony. Schnittke composed 9 symphonies, 6 concerti grossi, 4 violin concertos, 2 cello concertos, concertos for piano and a triple concerto for violin, viola and cello, as well as 4 string quartets and much other chamber music, ballet scores, choral and vocal works. His first opera, “Life with an Idiot”, was premiered in Amsterdam (April 1992). His two new operas, “Gesualdo” and “Historia von D. Johann Fausten” were unveiled in Vienna (May 1995) and Hamburg (June 1995) respectively. From the 1980s, Schnittke's music gained increasing exposure and international acclaim. Schnittke has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including Austrian State Prize in 1991, Japan's Imperial Prize in 1992, and, most recently the Slava-Gloria-Prize in Moscow in June 1998; his music has been celebrated with retrospectives and major festivals worldwide. More than 50 compact discs devoted exclusively to his music have been released in the last ten years. In 1985, Schnittke suffered the first of a series of serious strokes. Despite his physical frailty, however, Schnittke suffered no loss of creative imagination, individuality or productivity. Beginning in 1990, Schnittke resided in Hamburg, maintaining dual German-Russian citizenship. He died, after suffering another stroke, on 3 August 1998 in Hamburg. He was married to pianist [a1965440].


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